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Pan to a Selected Distance
Tip# 3484 By James Bainbridge On 13-Sep-2010
2
Rated By 2 users
Categories : 2D Operations
Software type : AutoCAD 2011
Rename File To : No Files to download.
Specify a distance and direction to pan the drawing display.

James Bainbridge shares a method he uses to pan to specific distances in AutoCAD.

"One function that I use on a daily basis is the -p or -pan command, which allows me to specify a distance and direction to pan the drawing display. I use this function to avoid constantly scrolling in and out, or clicking and panning numerous times to move the display view. Using the -pan command also seems to prevent the regeneration of hatch patterns and mtext while panning. I've been using this command since AutoCAD 2004.

"Simply key in -p, pick a point on the screen as a start point, move the cursor in the direction you want to move the view (I usually have ortho mode on for this), and enter a distance (either by using a selected point or through the Command line)."
 
Notes from Cadalyst Tip Patrol: There are so many ways to perform a task in AutoCAD that it can drive you crazy! Panning is no exception; one of the most common methods is to press and hold the scroll wheel on your mouse. The method given above by our tipster is an interesting option. If you are working in a drawing that is relatively small, either method will work just fine and you will see little difference between the two. However, typing in -pan gives you the benefit of typing in the distance to travel, taking you to a faraway place with little effort — and the less effort, the more you can get done.
 

 

Average Rating:
2


User comments
Comment by McCormick,Lowell
Posted on 2010-09-13 14:21:21
"Notes from Cadalyst Tip Patrol: There are so many ways to perform a task in AutoCAD that it can drive you crazy! Panning is no exception; one of the most common methods is to press and hold the scroll wheel on your mouse. The method given above by our tipster is an interesting option. If you are working in a drawing that is relatively small, either method will work just fine and you will see little difference between the two. However, typing in -pan gives you the benefit of typing in the distance to travel ..." Point pan (-P) also allows ortho panning. I haven't found a way to do an ortho real time pan (with the little hand).
Comment by Bentz,Don
Posted on 2010-09-13 15:47:41
Another method for navagating around a drawing is the "Dynamic" option of the zoom command. When in the zoom command, type "D" and the screen shows the drawing extents with a green dashed box showing the current screen view. There is also a white box, same size as the green, that you can move anywhere on the screen and it will become the new screen display by right-clicking. Left click and move the mouse to resize. A great feature that is under-used.
Comment by Kellogg,c. Frank
Posted on 2010-09-13 17:22:20
I use the -pan command primarily in paperspace viewports. If I want to show something differently, say for design options, I make a copy of the original objects at set distance away in ortho, and modify the copy however I want. Then I can copy the viewport on the same layout, and -pan to the alternate detail. This works great for Elevation views and Sections of the same objects. Everything stays lined up on paper. Or, I can copy the whole layout, go to the new layout's viewport that has the original objects, and -pan over to the new version. Viola! ;-) I got into the habit of copy / moving things a set distance in ortho a long time ago. That way, if you miss something, or grab something you did not want to move, you can just move it back, or copy the missed object, without having to select points (possibly the wrong one). CFK


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